2012 Acquisitions

 

Pippin Drysdale

born 1943 Melbourne, Victoria
works Fremantle, Western Australia

Pippin Drysdale is arguably Western Australia’s most internationally successful ceramic artist. Transcending functional ware, Drysdale’s careful and sophisticated approach to glazing and surface finish results in ‘three dimensional paintings’ that reflect the nuances and power of the Australian landscape. This work, based on a purplish palette, captures the feel and appearance of the closing of the day across the hills of the North-West of Western Australia. The gentle quietness of the whole is enlivened by the sharp flicker of bright colour on the bases of the vessels.

This work was acquired to extend AGWA’s holdings of Drysdale’s work. She was previously represented by eight single works spanning the years 1987 to 2002. The Gallery did not have a large group work that captured Drysdale’s interest in creating clusters of objects that complement each other and that create a sense of being within particular landscapes. Dusk ridge line 2011 is a major work that was sought to fill this particular gap.

Pippin Drysdale
Dusk ridge line 2011
porcelain
nine vessels: dimensions variable
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Purchased through the TomorrowFund,
Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation, 2012

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Daniel Walbidi

born c1983 Broome, Western Australia
works Bidyadanga, Western Australia
Language: Mangala / Yulparitja

Daniel Walbidi is the youngest of a group of mainly elderly artists that have emerged from the Bidyadanga community, situated some 250 kilometres north of Broome in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. In the early 1970s, Daniel’s family walked out from the water-starved desert to the coastal homelands of the Karajarri people, where they lived at La Grange Mission. Five tribal groups from surrounding country came together from this forced exodus and from this a new community developed: the collaborative relationships inspiring the particular Bidyadanga style seen today.

Walbidi’s artwork is predominantly concerned with depicting his father’s country in the Great Sandy Desert. His work is a sumptuous explosion of both saltwater and desert colours, lines of miniature dots revealing the long grids of distance and time travelled by the Bidyadanga people, both literally and metaphorically. The character of his work is highly representative of the Bidyadanga style, and Walbidi is now recognised as one of its leading exponents.


Daniel Walbidi
Kirriwirri & Kulyakartu 2011
synthetic polymer paint on canvas
121.5 x 120.5 cm
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Purchased through the TomorrowFund,
Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation, 2012


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